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Hit Your Target

September 11th, 2013

Paul Merrill

Good message - Got a blog? Take 5 minutes to write a quick blog post today. Bad message - your b2b prospects are all using social media - but are you reaching them effectively?Do you want your messages to hit the target? Read on…

The “bad” email shown at right came to me unsubscribed. I quickly clicked the unsubscribe link – since I didn’t ask for it, since I had never heard of the company, and since their message didn’t seem different from the sea of messages already sent to me.

Notice the four elements of your message being read:

1. Push or pull: Was the message requested by the receiver?

2. Recognition: Has the receiver heard of your organization?

3. Relevance: Does the message fill the receiver’s need?

4. Interest: Does your message grab the attention of your readers?

To break through the sea of information facing us today, your message must correctly answer as many of these questions as possible.

Here’s what you can do to improve your visibility in each of these areas:

1. Pull: Cold calling is necessary for many organizations to generate new business. If you get your foot in the door, you may be able to stay.

2. Recognition: If your name or brand is not widely known, do everything you can to increase your visibility. Using social media is a good and relatively inexpensive place to start.

3. Relevance: Look closely at your intended audience. If you create content for an actual human who needs what you are offering, you’ll be able to hit the target. As you describe this person, even give them a name. The more you know about them, the better you can meet their needs and wants. Think beyond what relates to your business – their unrelated needs may give you new approaches. Create content that’s useful to the recipient. Look at your message through the eyes of someone who does not work for your organization. Consider what would be valuable information and not just in terms of your product or service.

4. Interest: Even if your business is very technically oriented, some of your core audience will find your offerings interesting. Think about what makes your product or service distinct from the competition. Note the “good” example that features a very quick action point. The “bad” example features a negative question that places the receiver in a defensive position before they even open the email.

Contact me if you’d like help in improving your message!

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